Questions and Answers

0 Like 0 Dislike

Unknown

What micromechanics codes are available?

One of question cdmHUB proposes to answer is that what tools are available for composites simulation? As a start, we plan to compile a list of available micromechanics codes, including commercial codes, public domain codes, or research codes. To make the list as complete as possible, we need your help. If you know some micromechanics tools, please provide the name of the tool and contact information (an url will be sufficient). We will also appreciate  and a brief describe of your experience with it if you have used these tools.

Report abuse

7 Responses

  1. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Anonymous

    hello sir:


    I use:


    the Micromechanics 


    Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells Version 4.0 (MAC/GMC 4.0)


    MAC/GMC 4.0 is a computer code developed at NASA Glenn Research Center that analyzes the thermo-inelastic behavior of composite materials and laminates. The code is based on the micromechanics theory 


    known as the generalized method of cells (GMC).


    Feedback by imechanica.org user troy1987: http://imechanica.org/comment/26137#comment-26137

    Reply Report abuse Accept answer

    Please login to answer the question.

  2. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Anonymous

    TexGen is a very good tool for micromechanics modelling of woven composites. By Muhammad Rizwan ul Haq, Design & Analysis Engineer. https://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&gid=1905608&type=member&item=5900728416335839236&qid=e678896d-10c5-4565-955d-160429a25761&trk=groups_most_recent-0-b-ttl&goback=%2Egde_1905608_member_5900728416335839236%2Egmr_1905608

    Reply Report abuse Accept answer

    Please login to answer the question.

  3. 0 Dislike

    Anonymous

    Dear Johnathan,


    before my answer - I have few comments


    1. it would be more motivating to participate, if you start this list with the code you know or use :-)


    2. Which kind of composites you mean? Textile reinforced composites, or some else?


    3. To start (micro)mechanics you need geometry. Geometry creators/pre-processors, mechanical solvers for dry textiles and for composites should be devided as well into subgroups...


    For textiles:


    1. Wisetex  Suite (Wisetex+ TexComp)   https://www.mtm.kuleuven.be/Onderzoek/Composites/software/wisetex


    is able to create microceslls for woven, braided, stitched and some weft knitted structures, where the woven and braided unit cells are computed using the minimum of the energy of the yarns in the cells. Closed code, commercial available by KUL, with a lot of papers reported. I am using this for teaching and IF you know what you do and how to do it, gives very good results.


    TexComp has implemented various homogenisation methods which can be applied over the structures, created with WiseTex


    2. To the TexGen comment down, http://texgen.sourceforge.net/index.php/Main_Page  Open Source GPL, License.


    It is a Textile Generator, which allows creation of woven structures using wizards or ANY structure, if you use Python API for instance. But it in the open source part is not known for me to be available MECHANICS for calculations. It is as well very good code for fast creation of textile structures with standard set of exports format, which I use as well very successfully in educataion.


    3. For Warp knitted structures there is Loop3D code     commercial available by http://www.texmind.com, which allows generation of the 3D geometry of various warp knitted structures and their export to WiseTex, TexGen or other formats like Ansys APDL, Abaqus etc..  It is my code, I am happy with it, but I know what it can do and what not.


    4. For regular braided (tubular and flat) there is TexMind Braider http://www.texmind.com  which generates 3D geometrical models of these structures and can be as well exported - see the previous point.

    Reply Report abuse Accept answer

    Please login to answer the question.

  4. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Anonymous

    Hello Johnathan Goodsell, check out MultiMech at www.MultiMechanics.com. It is focused on TRUE multiscale analysis and virtual tests of composite materials, including fabrics, short, long continuous fiber and particulate composites. Even though an advanced FE tool, it comes with a very intuitive interface allowing you to perform sophisticated analysis in 3 basic steps. Feedback by Gleyce Any Sales, see: https://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&gid=124555&type=member&item=5900626853080633346&commentID=5901820496718110720&qid=2ab10ab4-9846-4c0c-b56d-b89feed64ea4&trk=groups_items_see_more-0-b-cmn#commentID_5901820496718110720


     


     

    Reply Report abuse Accept answer

    Please login to answer the question.

  5. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Anonymous

    Hi Johnathan,



    I work for e-Xstream Engineering, the developers of Digimat. Digimat has added a lot of features over the last 11 years to address micro-mechanics for many types of composites. Details can be found on our website.


    http://e-xstream.com/


    Good luck with your list.
    ~Bob

    Reply Report abuse Accept answer

    Please login to answer the question.

  6. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Anonymous

    Have you checked out StressCheck fromwww.esrd.com? One of the professors at Purdue, Dr. Byron Pipes, has experience with StressCheck. By Linkedin User:  Brent Lancaster through email. 

    Reply Report abuse Accept answer

    Please login to answer the question.

  7. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Anonymous

    Check the Permix at www.permix.org, which is a very nice platform for multiscale analysis of solids. Feedback from linkedIn user Maciej Wysocki.

    Reply Report abuse Accept answer

    Please login to answer the question.

Do not forget to select the best answer for your question.